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  Regions of intensification of extreme snowfall under future warming

Quante, L., Willner, S., Middelanis, R., Levermann, A. (2021): Regions of intensification of extreme snowfall under future warming. - Scientific Reports, 11, 16621.
https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-95979-4

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Item Permalink: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/pubman/item/item_25671 Version Permalink: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/pubman/item/item_25671_5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Quante, Lennart1, Author              
Willner, Sven1, Author              
Middelanis, Robin1, Author              
Levermann, Anders1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, ou_persistent13              

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 Abstract: Due to climate change the frequency and character of precipitation are changing as the hydrological cycle intensifies. With regards to snowfall, global warming has two opposing influences; increasing humidity enables intense snowfall, whereas higher temperatures decrease the likelihood of snowfall. Here we show an intensification of extreme snowfall across large areas of the Northern Hemisphere under future warming. This is robust across an ensemble of global climate models when they are bias-corrected with observational data. While mean daily snowfall decreases, both the 99th and the 99.9th percentiles of daily snowfall increase in many regions in the next decades, especially for Northern America and Asia. Additionally, the average intensity of snowfall events exceeding these percentiles as experienced historically increases in many regions. This is likely to pose a challenge to municipalities in mid to high latitudes. Overall, extreme snowfall events are likely to become an increasingly important impact of climate change in the next decades, even if they will become rarer, but not necessarily less intense, in the second half of the century.

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 Dates: 2021-07-272021-08-172021-08-17
 Publication Status: Finally published
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: Model / method: Model Intercomparison
Model / method: Quantitative Methods
Organisational keyword: RD4 - Complexity Science
PIKDOMAIN: RD4 - Complexity Science
Research topic keyword: Extremes
Research topic keyword: Atmosphere
Research topic keyword: Weather
Regional keyword: Global
MDB-ID: yes - 3215
Working Group: Numerical analysis of global economic impacts
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-95979-4
OATYPE: Gold - DEAL Springer Nature
 Degree: -

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Project name : QUIDIC
Grant ID : 01LP1907A
Funding program : Klimawandel und Extremereignisse (ClimXtreme)
Funding organization : BMBF

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Title: Scientific Reports
Source Genre: Journal, SCI, Scopus, p3, OA
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 16621 Start / End Page: - Identifier: CoNE: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/cone/journals/resource/journals2_395
Publisher: Springer Nature