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Alternative electrification pathways for light-duty vehicles in the European transport sector

Authors
/persons/resource/Rottoli

Rottoli,  Marianna
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/dirnaichner

Dirnaichner,  Alois
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Robert.Pietzcker

Pietzcker,  Robert C.
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Felix.Schreyer

Schreyer,  Felix
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Gunnar.Luderer

Luderer,  Gunnar
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

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Citation

Rottoli, M., Dirnaichner, A., Pietzcker, R. C., Schreyer, F., Luderer, G. (2021): Alternative electrification pathways for light-duty vehicles in the European transport sector. - Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, 99, 103005.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trd.2021.103005


Cite as: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/pubman/item/item_26081
Abstract
There is a wide consensus that a fundamental technology shift within the light duty vehicles (LDVs) sector is necessary to achieve the emissions reductions required for the Paris Agreement’s targets, but substantial controversy prevails about the most suitable strategy. While some decision makers favor a transition to battery electric vehicles, others advocate for fuel cell vehicles and e-fuels. These strategies differ markedly in terms of consumer acceptance and implications for the energy system. We explore a range of electrification pathways in Europe until 2050. Direct electrification leads to a strong reduction in direct CO2 emissions of LDVs, with electric vehicles reaching 90% of sales in 2050. Indirect electrification places substantially higher pressure on the supply sector, with almost double the primary energy demand relative to direct electricity use. In addition, the implementation of complementary policies addressing perceived inconvenience markups for alternative mobility is crucial to initiate the mobility transformation.