English
 
Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Climate-induced hysteresis of the tropical forest in a fire-enabled Earth system model

Authors
/persons/resource/markus.drueke

Drüke,  Markus
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Werner.von.Bloh

von Bloh,  Werner
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Boris.Sakschewski

Sakschewski,  Boris
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Nico.Wunderling

Wunderling,  Nico
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/petri

Petri,  Stefan
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

Cardoso,  Manoel
External Organizations;

Barbosa,  Henrique M. J.
External Organizations;

/persons/resource/Kirsten.Thonicke

Thonicke,  Kirsten
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PIKpublic
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Drüke, M., von Bloh, W., Sakschewski, B., Wunderling, N., Petri, S., Cardoso, M., Barbosa, H. M. J., Thonicke, K. (in press): Climate-induced hysteresis of the tropical forest in a fire-enabled Earth system model. - European Physical Journal - Special Topics.


Cite as: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/pubman/item/item_25573
Abstract
Tropical rainforests are recognized as one of the terrestrialtipping elements which could have profound impacts on the global cli-mate, once their vegetation has transitioned into savanna or grasslandstates. While several studies investigated the savannization of, e.g., theAmazon rainforest, few studies considered the influence of fire. Fire isexpected to potentially shift the savanna-forest boundary and henceimpact the dynamical equilibrium between these two possible vegeta-tion states under changing climate. To investigate the climate-inducedhysteresis in pan-tropical forests and the impact of fire under future cli-mate conditions, we employed the Earth system model CM2Mc, whichis biophysically coupled to the fire-enabled state-of-the-art dynamicglobal vegetation model LPJmL. We conducted several simulation ex-periments where atmospheric CO2concentrations increased (impactphase) and decreased from the new state (recovery phase), each withand without enabling wildfires. We find a hysteresis of the biomassand vegetation cover in tropical forest systems, with a strong regionalheterogeneity. After biomass loss along increasing atmospheric CO2concentrations and accompanied mean surface temperature increase ofabout 4°C (impact phase), the system does not recover completely intoits original state on its return path, even though atmospheric CO2concentrations return to their original state. While not detecting large-scale tipping points, our results show a climate-induced hysteresis intropical forest and lagged responses in forest recovery after the climatehas returned to its original state. Wildfires slightly widen the climate-induced hysteresis in tropical forests and lead to a lagged response inforest recovery by ca. 30 years.