English
 
Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Convolution of individual and group identity: self-reliance increases polarisation in basic opinion model

Authors
/persons/resource/Lennart.Quante

Quante,  Lennart
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

/persons/resource/Stechemesser

Stechemesser,  Annika
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

Hödtke,  Damian
External Organizations;

/persons/resource/Levermann

Levermann,  Anders
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;
Submitting Corresponding Author, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PIKpublic
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Quante, L., Stechemesser, A., Hödtke, D., Levermann, A. (in press): Convolution of individual and group identity: self-reliance increases polarisation in basic opinion model. - Humanities and Social Sciences Communications.


Cite as: https://publications.pik-potsdam.de/pubman/item/item_29982
Abstract
Opinion formation within society follows complex dynamics. Towards its understanding, axiomatic theory can complement data analysis. To this end we propose an axiomatic model of opinion formation that aims to capture the interaction of individual conviction with social influence in a minimalist fashion. Despite only representing that (1) agents have an initial conviction with respect to a topic and are (2) influenced by their neighbours, the model shows emergence of opinion clusters from an initially unstructured state. Here, we show that increasing individual self-reliance makes agents more likely to align their socially influenced opinion with their inner conviction which concomitantly leads to increased polarisation. The opinion drift observed with increasing self-reliance may be a plausible analogue of polarisation trends in the real world. Modelling the basic traits of striving for individual versus group identity, we find a trade-off between individual fulfilment and societal cohesion. This finding from fundamental assumptions can serve as a building block to explain opinion polarisation.